Research

A short description of the department's research follows. Click on the link in the end of each description to get more information about the project and the research group.

Anna Arnqvist - Associate Professor

Helicobacter pylori

Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human stomach and is established to cause chronic active gastritis and peptic ulcer disease as well as gastric cancer. We want to elucidate molecular mechanisms involved in activation and de-activation H. pylori adherence properties.

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Ronnie Berntsson - Assistant Professor

Structural biology of Type 4 Secretion Systems from gram-positive bacteria

Type 4 Secretion Systems facilitate DNA transfer between bacterial cells, also in between different species, and are a major mechanism behind the spread of antibiotic resistance. Our group studies these systems from Gram-positive bacteria, in order to understand, at a molecular level, how DNA is transferred between these cells.

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Stefan Björklund - Professor

The mediator complex and its function in transcriptional regulation at the molecular level

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Thomas Borén - Professor

Protein-carbohydrate interactions during health and disease

The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori express several attachment proteins to match the shifts in glycosylation patterns of the human stomach during persistent infection and chronic infection. The project aims to better understand how bacterial attachment proteins adapt to the individual host during infection.

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Lars-Anders Carlson - Assistant Professor

How do viruses reshape cellular membranes?

Positive-sense RNA viruses drastically rearrange the membranes of the cells they infect, creating genome-replicating organelles called replication complexes. We use cryo-electron tomography of infected cells, along with in vitro reconstitution approaches, to study the structure and mechanism of such viral genome factories.

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Sven Carlsson - Professor

Protein transport in the cell

A major system for protein delivery within the eukaryotic cell relies on the formation and targeting of membrane-enclosed transport vesicles. A multitude of factors are required to assist and regulate the generation of such vesicles. The research is focused on the identification of factors important for vesicle biogenesis and to establish their roles in the cell.

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Andrei Chabes - Professor

The building blocks of DNA and genome stability

The four dNTPs (dATP, dTTP, dCTP and dGTP) are the building blocks of DNA. A balanced supply and a correct overall concentration of dNTPs are key prerequisites for faithful genome duplication. We investigate how the DNA damage checkpoint, a genome surveillance mechanism, regulates the concentration of dNTPs, how the imbalanced ratios of the four dNTP pools affect the fidelity of DNA replication, and how different replication errors are recognized and repaired.

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Anders Hofer - Associate Professor

Nucleotide biosynthesis in the parasite Typanosoma brucei

African sleeping sickness is caused by Trypanosoma brucei. We study how this parasite makes the building blocks of RNA and DNA.

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Erik Johansson - Professor

Replicating the genome

There are many known DNA polymerases in the eukaryotic cell today, but only three have been determined to play a role during the replication of the nuclear DNA. We have focused on DNA polymerase epsilon and would like to know how this DNA polymerase participates at the replication fork, in DNA repair, and in regulating the cell-cycle progression of the cell.

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Richard Lundmark - Associate Professor

Membrane remodelling machineries

Membrane trafficking includes the secretory and endocytic transport of proteins in cells, which is fundamental to many biological processes.We study proteins and mechanisms that are required to re-sculpture cellular membranes into highly curved vesicular structures, a necessity for trafficking, compartmentalization and balancing of the membrane integrity in cells as well as virus replication during infection.

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Ludmilla Morozova-Roche - Professor

Amyloid formation - from molecular mechanisms to disease and novel nanomaterials

Protein self-association into amyloid oligomers and fibrils and their deposition in the body is a hallmark of a number of human pathologies including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, diabetes mellitus and others. We study in depth the multiple faces of this phenomenon, including structural and regulatory mechanisms governing amyloid formation in vivo and in vitro , cytotoxicity of amyloids and misfolded protein complexes towards normal and tumor cells, immune response to them in the biological fluids of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease patients as well as the applications of amyloids as novel nanomaterials in nanobiotechnology.

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Tor Ny - Professor

Extracellular matrix degrading proteases and their inhibitors

Matrix degrading proteases are involved in a large range of physiological and pathological tissue-remodeling processes, such as wound healing, ovulation and rheumatoid arthritis. We study the functional role of proteases in such processes. We also study the structure and function of serine protease inhibitors (serpins).

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Anders Olofsson - Assistant Professor

Amyloid Fibrils and Cytotoxic Oligomers

Amyloidosis denotes a pathological condition characterized by fibrillar deposition of proteins and peptides. Up to date more than 25 human disorders have been linked to formation of amyloid. The fibrillar depositions may accumulate locally or systemic and depending on the associated protein as well as site of deposition, it can result in many different symptoms. The overall aim with our work is to understand the mechanism by which native, endogenous, polypeptides transforms into a pathological assembly and further to develop means for intervention. We focus on the complete chain of events spanning from a monomeric polypeptide to mature amyloid with a specific focus on the intermediate formation of oligomeric assemblies. Our established techniques involve recombinant expression and purification of proteins and peptides, CD, fluorescence, NMR, AFM, SPR, X-ray as well as immunological techniques. Moreover, using cell-based system for analysis of viability, correlations between structural properties and cytotoxic propensity can be made. Our work is focused on Familial Amyloidosis with Polyneuropathy as well as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

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Nasim Sabouri - Assistant Professor

Maintenance of genome integrity by DNA Helicases

One of the challenges in cancer biology is to understand what happens when the molecular mechanisms of a normal cell become dysfunctional and cause cancer. We are studying how genome integrity is preserved and the consequences of modifying the program of DNA replication.

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Jürgen Schleucher - Professor

Biomolecular function from molecular scale to global scale

Proteins and nucleic acids carry out the body's functions. We investigate their structures and dynamics, to understand how they work in health and disease. The picture shows the epsilon RNA of the Hepatitis B virus, it contains nucleotides that are mobile (colored) yet conserved, indicating that structure and molecular mobility are optimized in evolution.

Stable isotopes occur everywhere in nature. We use them as tracers of metabolic regulation, from the scale of biochemical pathways to the global biosphere. Which enzymes regulate pathways in unperturbed organisms? How will the global photosynthesis respond to Climate Change?

NMR methods development is a central complement to both research fields.

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Lars Thelander - Professor Emeritus

Making the building blocks to the genome

The enzyme ribonucleotide reductase synthesize the building blocks to DNA. We want to understand how this synthesis is regulated in various organisms. We also study the nucleotide metabolism in Trypanosoms, a parasite that causes African sleeping sickness, with the goal to find new drug-targets.

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Sjoerd Wanrooij - Assistant Professor

Molecular mechanism of DNA repair and replication in human mitochondria

Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes for genes that are essential for proper energy production. Loss of mtDNA function results in a broad range of genetic human disorders, and it is increasingly recognized as a significant factor in common disorders such as neurodegeneration. Our group investigates detailed molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial DNA replication and repair in order to better understand the underlying causes of such disease states. 


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